LA is doing water better than your city. Yes, that LA.

SHORT FILM / ARTICLE

Matt Simon, Wired, 12 June 2018

But Los Angeles is in the midst of an aqueous awakening, setting an ambitious goal to cut its reliance on imported water in half by 2025 by following an increasingly urgent rule of good water policy: diversification. In a nutshell, that means getting your water from a range of sources—rain capture, aquifers, wells, desalination, even right out of the air. A study from UCLA earlier this year even said the city could feasibly reach 100 percent locally sourced water. To do it, the city is diving into a series of high- and low-tech campaigns that could transform Los Angeles into a model city for water management.


To find out about Singapore’s ‘Four Taps’ and leading water supply policy click here.

Smart cities: Digital solutions for a more livable future

REPORT

McKinsey Global Institute, June 2018

After a decade of trial and error, municipal leaders are realizing that smart-city strategies start with people, not technology. “Smartness” is not just about installing digital interfaces in traditional infrastructure or streamlining city operations. It is also about using technology and data purposefully to make better decisions and deliver a better quality of life.


To download the Briefing Note for the report click here.

How Cities Work

BOOK

James Gulliver Hancock, Lonely Planet Kids, 2016

City Living. The next time you’re in a big city, look around you. Do all the buildings and houses look the same? Many cities around the world are hundreds of years old, and contain lots of different types of architecture. 

The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert Caro review – a landmark study

Oliver Burkeman, The Guardian, 23 Oct 2015

ARTICLE

Technically, Robert Caro’s book The Power Broker is a biography of urban planner Robert Moses, but that description feels laughably inadequate on multiple counts. For more than four decades, this particular urban planner was the most powerful man in New York, an unelected emperor who dominated the mayors and governors who were supposedly in charge, and who physically reshaped the city through sheer force of will. Caro’s enormous book, meanwhile, is less a life story than an epic, meticulously detailed study of power in general: how it’s acquired, how it’s used to change history, how it ultimately corrupts those who get it.


See also Citizen Jane: Battle for the City.

America’s cities and towns spent as much on water and sewage at the start of the 20th Century as the Federal Government spent on the Post Office and the Army.

Edward Glaeser, economist