In search of the real Adam Smith

ARTICLE

Jesse Norman, The Financial Times, 22 June 2018

For Smith, the crucial linking idea is that of the continuous exchange that occurs in all human interaction. This may be the exchange of goods and services in markets. But it can also be the exchange of meanings in language and in other forms of communication. And it can be the exchange of regard or esteem that in Smith’s view underlies the formation of moral and social norms in society.


To visit Jesse Norman MP’s website click here.

RECENT POST

Was Karl Marx right?

SHORT FILM

Open Future, The Economist, 4 May 2018

Although there is a lot to learn from Marx, his solution was far worse than the disease. At the same time it can’t be said that today’s capitalism, dominated by immense inequality and  financial crises has triumphed. 


For more from The Economist and their Open Future project, click here.

Liberalism: where did it come from and are its days numbered?

SHORT FILM

Open Future, The Economist, 17 April 2018

Liberalism has been the dominant political philosophy in the West for more than 200 years. Populists say liberals are too elite and are out of touch with ordinary people. Here’s what you need to know about liberalism and its place in modern society.


For more from The Economist and their Open Future project, click here.

The New Urban Crisis

PODCAST

Andrew Tuck, Monocle, 4 May 2017

Special interview: Richard Florida

Our cities have become small little areas of concentrated wealth and advantage for the global super rich, for knowledge workers, for the members of my own creative class. It’s not just the 1%, it’s about a third of us who can make a go, but then the other two thirds, falling further and further behind and surrounding these areas of concentrated advantage much larger spans of concentrated disadvantage, and those are not only in the city, what’s so interesting about The New Urban Crisis, that’s spread out to what we used to think of as the great affluent suburbs, so it really is a new geographic divide in our society, and that divide is not only causing inequality it’s causing this terrible backlash.


To visit Richard Florida’s website click here, for an article from The Guardian about his previous thesis on The Creative Class and it’s relationship to The New Urban Crisis click here, and for a longer discussion of The New Urban Crisis with the LSE Cities Ricky Burdett click here.

What is Urban Resilience?

INFOGRAPHIC

100 Resilient Cities

Why do we focus on cities? First, the world is rapidly urbanizing—by 2050, 75% of the world’s population will live in cities. Second, global pressures that play out at a city scale − such as climate change, disease pandemics, economic fluctuations, and terrorism − pose new challenges and uncertainty. Sudden shocks or accumulating stresses in cities can cause significant damage and disruption; in 2011, the cost of natural disasters was estimated at over $380 billion. Because city systems are interconnected, breakdowns can lead to multiple or sequential failure. At worst, this can result in social breakdown, physical collapse, or economic decline.


For more from 100 Resilient Cities, click here.

Ten things you need to know about the New Urban Agenda

ARTICLE

Lucinda Hartley, Landscape Australia, 24 Oct 2016

The New Urban Agenda represents a paradigm shift in global thinking, recognising what professionals have perhaps understood for some time: that our future is urban. From gender-equity to youth-empowerment, participatory planning to inclusive public space, The New Urban Agenda sets a high benchmark for the type of urban development we should strive for and a global accountability framework for achieving it. Its catch-cry to “leave no one behind” commits to reducing urban inequality. This is a challenge that we can take up and apply to every city and neighbourhood.


For UN Habitat‘s New Urban Agenda whiteboard video click here.

Outsider Economics

SHORT FILM

David McWilliams, Punk Economics, ft.com

And, of course, outsiderdom is politically located where the nationalist old and disenfranchised you intersect. Outsiders are not defined by traditional labels, but they do form strange coalitions. So the small shopkeeper could well have conservative instincts, while the twenty-something tattooed barista could be liberal to her core. Yet both of them see themselves as outsiders, and neither has a voice, but what they do have is a vote and every once in a while, if pushed, they say – enough!


For more from David McWilliams and his work on contemporary economics, click here.